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done a study for the department of education and submitted a report which was lost somewhere in the department of education. later, u.s. news and world report tried to track it down. wasn't able to do it. professor judith kleinfilled called and it wasn't exactly 8-1, reporters at the time, the boston globe, as they reported the statistic that is true, parents were told -- much more voluble, and shrinking violence. exactly the opposite is true. the typical classroom, no one calls on them. it is true boys get more attention, more careful research, it was negative attention. boys are more unruly or the teacher will say the president of france, johnny is not listening, there are more reprimands but more positive engagement comment in fact fairly good data from the department of education that they feel they have a right to express their opinions and if the teacher wants to hear what they have to say and far fewer boys feel that way. >> host: that leads into your second book "the war against boys: how misguided policies are harming our young men". just updated this year. the new e
. and by the time i was engaging with the gender educators, i learned that you must always check the data. and i just couldn't find it. he did not appear that the research was anywhere that this factoid was documented. and it turned out that he had done a study for the department of education and it was lost somewhere in the department of education. later, she wasn't able to do it, the professor did a follow-up and he admitted that it wasn't exactly 81, it was less a matter something like that. but none of that, for some reason, the reporters of the time, including "the washington post", they reported this statistic as true. boys were treated much more respectfully and valuable and they assert themselves and girls are sort of lacking balance. that is exactly the opposite was true. a typical classroom, the boys are often sitting in the back to spring the known cause on them and it's true that they may get more attention in some cases, but more careful research shows that it's negative attention at times because boys are more unruly and so the teacher will say, who do you think is the president of
we know it's harder to find a job today without some higher education, so we have helped more students go to college with grants and loans that go father than before. we have made it more practical to repay those loans. we're also pursuing an aggressive strategy to promote innovation that reigns in tuition costs. we have got to lower costs so that young people are not burdened by enormous debt when they make the right decision to get higher education. and next week michelle and i will bring together college presidents and nonprofits to help more low-incoming students attend and succeed in college. [ applause ] >> but while -- while higher education may be the surest path to the middle class, it's not the only one. we should offer our people the best technical education in the word. that's why we have connected local businesses with community colleges so workers can learn the skills that earn them more money. and i know all of you have champi championed making high quality preschool available to ever child in america. [ applause ] >> we know that kids in in these programs grow
and being responsive and looking at workers compensation reform or hiving -- or having a highly educated labor sector. drive an things help economy. people in the past said, well, we really don't have enough fossil fuel supply. but now we know, through technology and innovation, having the good and fair regulations, that we do have energy supply. so my state of oklahoma, since 2011 when i took office because of our business-friendly policies, education, reform we have done, making government smaller and more efficient, we have seen our economy change. the per capita income has grown by 8% for a family of four. >> it is self-defense. you have a guy who will steal every last job from you if they can. rick perry -- he is glad they are up here right now. while we are up here talking, he had his people on the phone to ohio and oklahoma stealing their jobs. >> we fish where the fish are. and generally speaking, i am spending a lot more time in california or illinois and new york than i am in oklahoma. >> we just beat him in football. [laughter] >> you know how to hurt a person, mary. >> but li
children. i'm focusing on taking care of them and making them happy and make sure they get the education so they don't have to work a fast food ra.t restaurant at 9 . >> for the past three weeks i have been working nights and weekends because christmastime is coming up. >> one day she plans to return to college and ultimately changing careers. a bump in pay would help make that happen. >> the vatican is starting a new program to fight sexual abecause in the catholic church. pope francis is putting together a committee for a way to protect children from pedophiles and improve screening from proo pris and help those that have been abused. >> they ar dealing with the sexual abuse crisis is vital for the church's credibility. >> twenty-five soldiers were killed in a suicide attack at the yemen defense three. a car bomb wait went off. shortly after the bombing gunmen opened fire. no one has claimed responsibility. the interim government has had ongoing problems with al qaeda linked groups and northern rebels. >> secretary of state john kerry is meeting with the palestinian officials hoo today.
, julie has done on affordable care act. a lot to talk about today including some disturbing education all rankings coming out. >> we'll get to that. we'll begin with the train derailment in new york. federal investigators are turning their attention to the engineer as new revelations of just how fast the train was going. the train was going 82 miles per hour when it took that curve. it should have been traveling at just 30 miles per hour. nbc's tom costello has the latest on the investigation. >> reporter: on the tracks in the bronx mta crews lifted the remains of the broken train as crash investigators went in for a closer look. tons of twisted steel scraped and crushed from sunday's violent crash. the ntsb announced the two black boxes recovered from the train revealed a stunning development. >> train was traveling at approximately 82 miles per hour as it went into a 30 mile-per-hour curve. >> reporter: 82 miles per hour. only six seconds before the train came to a complete second engine power was cutback. then the engineer suddenly applied full brakes. >> when i heard about the speed,
. they will pour resources into helping to improve the education of every child growing up in their native land. mandela greatly valued education. he once said education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world. >> education was just very, very important to my grandfather. education is one of his things that he's so passionate about. every single one our family was educated. because he said when you're educated nobody else can take it away from you. >> for their support, for their love, for their dedication towards my father and the family. to thank them for their prayers and comfort during this difficult time. >> our thanks to the mandela family for sharing their father with the world. in the words of else in mandela, for to be free is not nearly to cast off ones chains but to live in a way that enhances the freedom of others. his daughter says he achieved that through the practice of peace and reconciliation. >> thank you, kelly. there are some new concerns over so-called energy drinks. accord to a brand-new study, those beverages can pose a serious risk to your heart
. >> the idea that a child may never be age to escape that poverty because she lacks decent education, healthcare, o that should offend all of us and it should hell us to action. we are a better country than this. let me repeat. the combined trends of increase inequality and decreasing mobility poses a fundamental threat of our american dream, our way of life. >> here to discuss the inequality and prospect of a minimum wage hike, louis from cornell, do you accept the president's argument that income and equality are jeopardized? in. it's a tremendous difference from the experiences that we had from post-war period. it's the fundamental challenge for our society. not in terms of making sure every american who has a job earns enough to live but for those at the top. all that money piling at the top has nowhere to be invested. this is the challenge, the challenge of investment that doesn't just produce profit for the few but jobs for the many. >> stagnating income. the past 40 years, how does that track with the decline of influence with the labor movement in this country? >> it's exactl
then public, on things like education, jobs, people want good jobs. people want the american dream. if you look at the muscles in the -- if you look at doug post,ck's recent blog which i think was not in "atlantic" but it "politico"? sorry. thatnk it is totally right one of the great unifying factors in this country was if by a sethard, and play of fairness rules, you should do ok. kids,r guidepost for our the next generation, are they doing better than they are. that has changed. and people are really anxious about that. they want to work hard and they want to do ok. so i think there is -- when i looked at the elections, in new, chris christie won in jersey, that is true, but so did minimum wage expansion. virginia,liffe won in walsh in boston, palacios in new york. the person who was protested education -- >> could you speak up? >> the person who was pro- education won. so there is something going on in the country that is about, yes, working hard. nobody wants a handout. but let's level the playing field so we have great public education and we have ways for people to enter or reenter o
because she lacks a decent education or health care or a community that views her future as their own. that should offend all of us. and it should compel us to action. we are a better country than this. >> i mean, when we get to the point where children in no fault of their own are living in these situations and it's just discarded, that's troubling about the spirit of the country and those that are in government, congressman. >> well, a nation that wants to consider itself respectful and decent ought to want to have its citizens live a respectful and decent life. and to do so you've got to pay people a decent wage. we've got to raise the wage from $7.25 to $9. just think about this. in 1938 fdr was successful in getting the minimum wage raised. and from 1938 to 2013 it's raised only $7. they are having difficulty surviving. this nation is not a mean spirited nation. and the majority of the people, i think, go along with what we're saying. the problem is it will never be brought up to a vote here in the house of representatives. >> when the congressman says this is not a mean spirited
. >> the idea that a child may never escape the poverty because they lack decent education or health care or a community that views her future as their own, it should offend all of us and compel us to action. we are a better country than this. let me repeat: the combined trends of increased inequality and decreasing mobility pose a fundamental threat to the american dream, our way of life and what we stand for around the globe. >> there's a public polling unit and it was found that the president's approval rating among a core constituency that got him elected, that 19-24-year-old, a 41% approval rating. most concerning for the affordable care act is the poll asked young people will they enroll in the affordable care act. this group of young invincibles is key to have their involvement to make it work. 47% of the millennials 18-29 said they will not enrol. 57% it's approved. greater than the national average among the entire population. >> mike viqueira at the white house. >>> to illustrate the gap the highest 1% saw income rise an average of 31%. for everybody else it was less than one ha
job today without some higher education, so we've helped more students go to college with grants and loans that go farther than before. we've made it more practical to repay those loans and today more students are graduating from college than ever before. we're also pursuing an aggressive strategy to promote innovation that reins in tuition cost. we have a lower cost so young people are not burdened by enormous debt when they make the right decision to get higher education. and next week, michelle and i will bring together college presidents and non-profits to lead a campaign to help more low-income students attend and succeed in college. but -- [ applause ] while higher education may be the surest path to the middle class, it's not the only one. so we should offer our people the best technical education in the world. that's why we've worked to connect local businesses with community colleges so workers, young and old, can earn the new skills that earn them more money. and i've also embraced an idea that i know all of you at the center for american progress have championed. and b
. >> ...thought provoking >> get your damn education. >> ...surprising >> oh, absolutely! >> ...exclusive one-on-one interviews with the most interesting people of our time. >> you're listening because you want to see what's going to happen. >> i want to know what works what do you know works? >> conversations you won't find anywhere else. >> talk to al jazeera. >> only on al jazeera america. >> oh my! >>> welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm stephanie sy here are today's headlines. the u.s. economy is growing, but so is the income gap between the rich and the poor. president obama will talk about how to change that and other aspects of the economy when he speaks at a washington think tank in just a few minutes. vice president joe biden is meeting with chinese leaders in beijing but they didn't make any public comments over a dispute over a small group of islands in the east chai sea. >>> a senior leader of hezbollah is gunned down outside of his home in beirut. and they a blaming israel. israel is denying the accusations. >>> cigna announced it will no longer hire people who test positive
and that education is something that is available to all that we walk towards more pros spert pore young people in the country. when president obama was here a few short months ago, he talked about the ways it has the potential to be an after our strengths are linked to one another. i think that's the best way to memorialize all that he meant to us. >> we know december 15th is when will be the final good-bye, if that's appropriate to say, we'll see each other again, but the final good-bye here. i can't imagine there won't be a television set or radio on where people will gather and watch this moment that will be unmatched as far as the diversity and the range of people who sincerely say that this man changed their life, set the compass of their direction in life. >> that's so true, tamron. during the anti-apartheid moment, we used to chant all the time, the whole world is watching, here again he has made certain that the world world is watching, everyone is pausing and reflecting on what this man meant to us all. we count ourselves blessed to have lived in the shadow of his grace all of these y
's foundation called start-up education and the gates foundation are the major backers of education super highway. along with other foundations, the two groups raise $9 million to support the company. education super highway's goal to update technology in every school nationwide. organizers say believe it or not 70% of the schools in the nation have the equivalent of the old dial-up modem. space x this morning says its satellite that it was hired to put into orbit is right where it should be. tuesday evening more time the falcon 9 rocket lifted off delivering a commercial satellite into orbit for the very first time. now, space x has already sent unmanned capsules to the space station. this was the first satellite into orbit. elan musk's mom tweeted out "cool" as the rocket lifted off. >> i'm sure she's very proud of her son. thanks so much. >>> santana will celebrate hanukkah with a festral of lights today. organizers with the jewish federation of silicon valley expects hundreds of people to attend an annual community candlelighting event at the park valencia in san jose. the event will
education. that is the reality that the me millennial space. and no matter what people want to call obama or his policies if you don't see upward mobility, you can't have it on the watergate the boy or girl you want to build something for your own future if you want a family. that is reality for millennialist. >> politically it is interesting. there's a great cause of concern because obama won this group by massive majority and they thought that because he could relate to them, that they would be able to lock in this generation is a durable democratic voting majority going into the future. because if you could get them young, that is a part of their identity for the rest of their lives. these numbers is crushing these kids dreams. lou: the gap is larger across the entire force. >> one other thing that i think that the millennialist are is stupid and we can characterize this. but i don't think they are, i think they have caught on, and they have seen that there is no future and there is nothing happening and they have begun to realize that they have no part of that deal and they realize th
. >> pelley: nelson mandela once said education is the most powerful weapon you can use to change the world. jim axelrod found that message changed the hearts of some american students. >> reporter: when nelson mandela visited madison park high school in roxbury, massachusetts, in 1990 the crowd went wild. eager to hear his words of wisdom. >> the youth of today are the leaders of tomorrow. >> reporter: a 16-year-old sophomore in the gymnasium that day. >> the youth of today are the leaders of tomorrow. and at the time that was one of the things that really stuck to my head. so this day i try to instill the same concept in my students. >> reporter: mandela's speech was a turning point in dipina's young life. he decided he too wanted to lead from the classroom as a teacher. >> okay. the word freedom, but freedom is not free. >> reporter: now he's a history teacher at brighton high school in boston, hoping to a model in a school where more than one in ten students drop out. born to poor immigrant parents in the west african nation of cape verde, dipina knows well the barriers to a child's suc
to continue his education at florida state. >>> and in the nfl, two teams moving in different directions meet on thursday night. jacksonville, winners in three of their last four games, hosting houston, losers of ten straight. the jaguars used some trickery. ace sanders catching a lateral pass and throws it to jordan todman for a third quarter touchdown. the jags win, 27-20. >>> finally, nelson mandela once said sport has the power to change the world. as a young man, the human rights leader was an accomplished amateur boxer. a year after his historic election as south africa's first president was credited with bringing his nation together at the world cup final which south africa won. he got to host the2010 world cup. the first time that tournament was ever held in africa. and he was known for inspiring athletes across generations. boxing legend muhammad ali had this to say about mandela. he was a man whose heart, soul, and spirit could not be contained or restrained by racial and economic injustices, metal bars, or the burden of hate and revenge. >>> coming up after your local news on "cbs
is education. you have more people going to college than ever before, which means more debt, but that doesn't necessarily mean better paying jobs. we're talking about $15 to $20 an hour. do you think raising the minimum wage would have an impact on the way we at least think about education? would more people be less likely to want to go to school if they're getting paid more without having to go? >> i don't think the minimum wage has much of an impact on educational decision. i do think that college is still a good deal, but the reality is that inequality is growing even amongst those who actually go to college. the median college salary is not really keeping pace with the rest of the economy. so again, i think when thinking about the overall picture about inequality, we do need a number of different tools. i think the minimum wage plays one part of that but an important one. >> one of the arguments that corporations like mcdonald's and wendy's in particular like to make is, well, if we raise wages, then we're going to have to raise prices, and you guys don't want that and they throw out th
mandela and it will be tomorrow at f and b stadium in johannesburg and a belief that education was the only way for people to raise up from poverty and where that legacy stands today. and revolutionary cancer treatment and using one deadly disease to battle another. >> i'm mark and coming up, the afc race is heating up as manning is a leg up on the competition, that is ahead in sports. >>> wintry conditions will improve today but i'm tracking another round of snow for the northeast, i'll have details coming up. >>> al jazeera america continues and thomas and i are back with you in just 2 1/2 minutes. ♪ straight to the point. >> i'm on the ground every day finding stories that matter to you. >> in new orleans... >> seattle bureau... >> washington... >> detroit... >> chicago... >> nashville... >> los angeles... >> san francisco... >> al jazeera america, take a new look at news. >> from our headquarters in new york, here are the headlines this hour. >> al jazeera america is the only news channel that brings you live news at the top of every hour. >> a deal in the senate may be a
that the congressional black caucus under the leadership of our chairwoman has been strong and educating our constituents about the affordable care act. in conclusion, a remaining challenge that we have. the voting acts must be re-authorized that was eliminated by the supreme court that took away the provisions of pre-clearance, which, in fact, provided justice and the right to vote for all americans. we are gathered hopefully in a bipartisan manner, the leadership of mr. sensenbrenner and others who are on various committees and the congressional black caucus and the leadership of our congressional black caucus to come together to be able to accept the constitutional premise, best said by the constitution, we are created equal. and we have coddled the right to vote, welcomed the right to ote, reading a story about our puerto rico and citizens. and those of us on the mainland who have had obstacles thrown at us across the pathway that needed to be protected not only by the bill of rights, but by the voting rights act that withstood the test of time and it is important that we get a construct that all of
is it the education outcomes continue to decline when we increase federal control year after year after year but yet our outcomes continue to decline? even this week, another international poll coming out for that. why is it getting harder to start a company, find a job, pay your gas bill? why is it hard to fill up your gas and pay your cell phone? it's increasing fees and control and americans continue to get frustrated because they know this is not what we were designed to be. we're doing too many things. we've got to get back to trusting the american people, our state leaders, our local leaders and we've got to set the standard for what leadership looks like in america by our rhetoric and by our actions. we can honor people and honor each other even in our differences, but we've got to get back to doing this nation's business the way that american people in their heart know it should be done, where their voices are heard and where they get to make the decisions. with that i yield back. . the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentleman from california, mr. miller, for five minutes. mr.
government levels. and finally, prioritizing clean water, proper sanitation, hygiene education to preventing or responding to disease outbreaks. basically what we do together right now is the front-line response. we want to make sure people are safe, people have access to basic services and this continues on through an evolution. women and girls would potentially be at less risk, especially in evacuation centers of comprehensive plan to improve security for revenue growth is developed and implemented with cooperation of national police and other security services. opportunities for women to earn a living, especially those in households are essential for protections for abuse and exploitation. the context for recommendations include the typhoons disrupting sources of income for over 5.6 million men and women. i read that this morning i didn't realize how many people had lost sources of income. i beg you looking at a million, 2 million people. this morning it was 5.6 million women and children for women and men. it was astounding. the filipino department of health are warning several diseases
and then over time you're supposed to gain the skills and education to move out and do something else. the problem is, the very few people who get stuck as a career in minimum wage job, that is the problem we should be addressing how to train those people and get them skills and get them @oving somewhere else, not forcing walmart to have a hire minimum wage so it helps fewer people get starred on their careers. where did i go wrong with that, jonathan? >> i think you're right on the money, melissa. minimum wage causes unemployment. that is not my judgement. that is the judgement of the labor department in 1938. when first minimum wage was first enacted. many prominent economist. the minimum wage is discrimination. it is discrimination exactly what sabrina and you pointed out, low-skilled workers who need the first job. only 4% of the people making minimum wage are supporting a family full time and most of those individuals are able. whether it is at walmart or mcdonald's or anywhere else, move up the ladder. you have 40% of the mcdonald's ceos started making minimum wage. i believe so
and share ideas on tax reform, on education reform. on getting things done. we love the environment on you can actually achieve results. that's the great thing of being a governor. i look at so many of the members of the utah state legislature who are here. and with each one of them, i can tell you stories about how we were able to get things done and the can-do attitude. it was remarkable. joe then went on to the senate and became terribly frustrated with the culture that existed on capitol hill, something that evan knows a lot about. i went on to china to become our senior diplomat running the embassy there. and we kind of regrouped a little bit later when joe and nancy jacobson, who was the power behind no labels initially came and said would you like to become part of the o labels movement. what on earth is no labels? is it a third party effort to kind of ship wreck the republicans and the democrats. is it a bunch of mushy moderates to get together to take over the world? none of the above. come to find that it is a group that respects the fact that we have a two-party system. they are
the temporary frustrations of the affordable care roll out. >> a lot of it is education. they don't understand what it is and are afraid to go through the process. >> for andy peak the partial government shutdown created confusion and fear about the affordable care act. >> i didn't want to punch the bottom and sign up to pay $280-$300, adding it to my meagre month to month income. >> as the dust settles counselling from the music heath alliance allowed him to take a look and sign up. he'll pay around $150 a month. and for a career musician, that could allow him to pursue his passion of performing for the rest of his life. >>> the administration says healthcare.gov is functional for 80% of users. >>> let's get a look at the morning business headlines. european and u.s. banks are expected to be hit with a fine for manipulating key interest rates. reuters says six bangs will be fined more than $2 million. they rigged bench marks determining the cost of lending from mortgages the banks involved. more regulations will be invoked. banks would be banned from doing anything for their own game. the new
personal adversity and committed to philanthropy and higher education. you know who else got one this year? class of 2014, coty at honey well and jerry jones, owner of the cowboys. they're in great company with you. congratulations. that's a real honor. it's a big deal for the class of 2014. >> well, thank you for saying that joe. it is an honor. i admire the ratio society greatly. they take individuals andle challenge circumstances and give them an opportunity through scholarships to change their life through education. and to join companies not only those you mentioned but most importantly our previous winner our founder. i never thought it would happen in my lifetime. >> you didn't get it yet, did you? when do they do it? >> no. the event is in april in washington d.c. >> it's a big deal. >> it's quite something. i look forward to hit. >> can congratulations. we'll check back with you on. that think about it if you see the tape. i look good in that suit. >> actually joe, when i see the ron burgundy commercial, i do think of you. i don't know why. >> i think that's a compliment? thanks m
that poverty because she lacks a dicent education or health care or a community that views her future as their own, that should affect all of us. >> it should compel us to action. we are a better country. let me repeat. the combined trends of inceffed inequality pose a fundamental effect. >> republicans were quick to cit size of president's remarks. the income gap is caused by policies claiming that the affordable care act and tougher business regulations encourage company depends on the government. the statistics are telling. from 2009 to 2012 the average engine from the top 1% of earners increased 31%. incomes for the rest of the nation's workers rose by one half of one%. >> thousands of fast-food workers scheduled to last their ship are striking. in 100 cities they are striking, demanding pay. today's strikes are the latest move in a campaign that started last summer. the medium wage is slightly more than $900. >> the workers live in poverty, working in conditions. >> more than two and a quarter americans have non-management jobs with the top 10 fast food chains. anti-government fo
as to what they can do. if you have just a high school education -- i only had a high school education. the jobs were there when i came out of high school. it was not i thought. a kid with a high school education is pretty much in a deadlocked situation now. if he can even get a job. that is what needs to be done in my personal opinion. host: david in florida. caller: good morning. i believe that you are totally impartial and the way you do your job. thank you. i agree with a lot of what this gentleman was saying with regard to manufacturing. they are talking about raising the minimum wage to stimulate the economy. what are they consider stimulating the economy? putiding jobs for kids to something on the shelf at walmart? we don't make anything. it goes back to china. as far as the raising of the minimum wage, what people fail to realize is that when they raise it here and there -- to the average guy getting it, it is not that much money in his pocket every week. collectively throughout the nation, that is a whole lot more money that the government can tax and take from you. if they ra
, the administrative urban of educating and processing the enrollments prove almost as expensive as coverage itself. absorb thiscannot cost and ultimately the cost will be warmed by the public as a whole. the implementation also threatens the safety haven of a flexible work environment by those that work on it. inc. you again for the opportunity to testify today regarding health care law and its effects on the aggregation rules for small businesses like ours. we are committed to working with congress to find solutions that foster growth and truly benefit the communities we serve. >> thank you. our final witnesses donna baker. she is a certified public accountant in adrian michigan. she holds an nba from michigan state university and a ba in accounting. mba from michigan state university and a ba in accounting. >> thank you chairman collins, ranking member alaska's and other members of the committee. it is an honor to be here to testify on this subject. i am donna baker. my own accounting firm for the last 13 years. practice in michigan, a very small rural area. firm iof owning my own also own a sma
you the poster child for south africa's education. the mandela family was quoted describing you as the face of the new south africa. what is the face of the young generation of post-apartheid south africa. >> i think the young face of this new south africa is a dynamic face. we don't - our revolution will not be a political one. our revolution will be a revolution driven by innovation and prosperity across all income levels in south africa. we are very dynamic generation. my story is like that of millions of south africans. >> you describe this challenge rising to the challenge of innovation. what about domestically are there changes to that that young people face in south africa as they try to meet a global threshold to be competitive. >> certainly, which is why i believe my story resonates. a challenge is education. more south africans, world class education. the commitment to education, not just education, but achieving excellence. it's a challenge that i am sure my peers will adopt in the next couple of years. >> speaking of achieving educational excellence. is it true that
with the departments of housing him urban development, labor, justice, defense, health and human services, education committee, irs, some of the social security and small business administrations, as well as a number of other federal, state, and local agencies and organizations. veterans are counting on us to solve these challenges. for its part, v.a. operates a large health care -- integrated health care system, maybe one of the larger ones in the country, 151 medical centers, 871 clinics, 300 vet centers, and i know there are 70 mobile outreach clinics that reach out into the most rural areas defined veterans who live remotely. over 1700 remote access points nationwide. beyond health care, v.a. provides $10 billion in education assistance annually, second only to the department of education. v.a. guarantees nearly 1.8 million home loans, the only zero-down in the nation, and our foreclosure rate is lowest among all categories of mortgage loans. v.a. as the ninth largest life insurance, with 6.7 million clients and 95% customer satisfaction rating. to the support of the congress and the leadership
efficiencies, how we support education. >> i want to get to that in a moment. you have a long, deeply personal relationship with howard that dates back 25 years, when you were just 16. tell us the story of what brought you to howard university. >> at the age of 16, i was probably 80 pounds. i suffered from sickle cell anemia. i came to howard university because howard had a sickle cell center. my mom, a nurse, thought it would be a safe place healthwise. the second reason is because i wanted to pursue becoming a physician. i looked across the spectrum of universities that would give me that opportunity, howard had the best fit. my former prime minister, founder, father of our nation, as it were, who brought us into independence was a political professor at howard university. it has a strong name in the caribbean and was a strong connection for me. >> you come from trinidad and tobego. >> that is correct. >> you are a surgical oncologist by training. are you still practicing? >> on a limited basis. my operating room, my classroom as it were, day-to-day activities of administration plus my skill
education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. kand i don't have time foris morunreliable companies.b angie's list definitely saves me time and money. for over 18 years we've helped people take care of the things that matter most. join today. to help secure retirements and protect financial futures. to help communities recover and rebuild. for companies going from garage to global. on the ground, in the air, even into space. we repaid every dollar america lent us. and gave america back a profit. we're here to keep our promises. to help you realize a better tomorrow. from the families of aig, happy holidays. >>> welcome back to "the lead." he showed the world the true meaning of resilience and during 27 years as a prisoner in his native south africa, emerging from that torment to become his country's first black president, leading his people out of the ugliness that was apartheid. we are today remembering the remarkable life of nelson m
't about money. we spend plenty on money and number two is k-12 education. we are not the top 25, we are not the top 25 in k-12 education outcomes so it is not a matter of money you need to reengineer the system and i have a number of ideas about how to do that. >> maybe we will come back to that but there's a couple other bases i want to touch before i turn it over. under this broad entitlement reform, medicare is critical as you say. we also have social security. the other interesting chapter i think on what we should do to fix the social security system, say a little bit about that. >> in the scheme of things that should be easy. in the basketball and now the g8 should be a layup. you can miss the layup but on the other hand, with medicare and health care reform it is a three-point play for the opponent's basket. we have to dribble a little bit and take a few shots before we will put some points on the board. with social security we would have had competence in 1999 but for the blue dress incident. and it's not just a matter of what the reform ought to be that the process that you
, whether it's a much bigger or more inclusive middle class including blacks, whether it's better education, but you're absolutely right. the project is not finished. in fact, even particularly amongst the blacks, there is a massive income inequality, one of the biggest in the world. very, very poor people still living in shantytowns and the like while there is also at the same time a very rich and exploding black you know, economic super class. so that is an issue. the issue of corruption is still one that's alive and needs to be tackled. and the issue of education still needs to be tackled. he was very keen on the idea of education. but look, many people will say some of the very important things were not done. and they still have to be finished, but after mandela was released and after those first elections in south africa, so much more of this continent has become democratic. it's not a coincidence. >> christiane, so many world leaders when you talk about the leader of cuba, the united states and europe and african countries, it could not be more diverse. do you think there is a lesson,
with me at this time fond memories of systematic education, patient, calculated, measured, to ensure that we begin to appreciate that struggle is not just about emotional drive, but that we need it to learn the tactics that would make us [ inaudible ] to fight us, and enable us to survive through thick and thin. >> reporter: on the streets where he lived during apartheid people gathered too. this was a hot bed of -- [ technical difficulties ] >> he is a hero to all around the world. everyone is very sad right now because he is gone. >> reporter: many people here say they will celebrate his life. millions of south africans won't be able to attend the state funeral, but they plan to say farewell in their own way. they say they are going to line the streets all across south africa and say farewell to the father of the nation and thank you for making south africa what it is today. nelson mandela inspired millions of people to reconcile and forgive. they begin to prepare to say good-bye. >>> the death of nelson mandela is also hitting home. communities across the u.s. are paying tribute
don't have a job and you're in school and you're trying to better yoursel your education and you're burdened now with the demand that you get health care and you don't feel that you need it, you can't afford it, but there's a $95 fine you can pay to absolve you of your liability, of course they're going to do that. guess what, where are the young people, most of them, getting their funds from? either working one or two jobs and going to school or they're living with their parents and their parents are not going to foot the bill. >> how does it make sense, richard, to a young person to pay more for insurance than he or she otherwise would be doing so, so as to underwrite old americans, many of whom likely have more money than he or she, that young person does. how does that make sense? >> greg, i don't think it's making sense or not making sense issue. i think one, what brad is talking about, is a lot of college students and law students and ph.d. students are eligible to go back on their parent's health care insurance thanks to the affordable care act. so 3 million of them are al
of a pioneer of the future. the stated goal of udacity is to provide higher education for 90% reduction in cost. and so recently they announced at georgia tech that u, the acity was now going to take a $70,000 residential master's degree in advanced computing, and they were going to offer the master's degree online for $7,000. first of all, think about what that does to student loans. second, if you're an adult and this is a class you really need but you live in minnesota or you live in southern california and you're not going to move to georgia tech, you can now take it in the mornings, on the weekends, while you're on vacation. all of a sudden we've begun to liberate you from the professor's schedule. most education is stunningly inefficient. the course will be offered from 10:20 to 11:40 at the convenience of the professor three days a week. well, that's not -- that's the world that's going to rapidly disappear despite every effort of the prison guards at the university system to block it. the most famous example -- you can go look these things up yourself. i'm not making any of this stuff u
the young lady who fought for education and stood up against the taliban. number eight, the book empty mansions followed by bill o'reilly and martin daugaard's take on the murder of jesus of nazareth and killing jesus. and let's explore diabetes and a collection of essays by david taveras. >> linda robinson is next. she talks about the role of u.s. special operations forces in the world today and argues that they will be this countries primarily sole military force. this is about one hour. .. who
that today or tomorrow. the operator did survive. he was injured. educated that he tried to apply the brakes, that the train was coming into the curve quickly and he tried to apply the brakes. they want to see what that operator has to say. the speed in that part of the rail should have been 30 miles an hour. the train would have needed to slow from 70-mile an hour on the straight away to that 30 miles an hour. did that happen? investigators will be back on the rails today to try to look at the rails and the crumbled cars themselves to see what they can learn from that. >> ok. lisa stark reporting to us from washington. thank you. >> metro north has been working to prevent accidents. we have a look at some prior accidents in the mta history. >> it carries more than 82 million people a year, which is the busiest in the country. it's part of new york's metropolitan transportation authority. it is a system of subways, buses and commuters trains. the deadliest crash was in 1918 when a subway driver lost control in brooklyn. the last time passengers were killed in an m.t. the a. crash was 1991 wh
for a country that spends more on education than anything else. it's a key test given to 15-year-olds in 65 countries. the u.s. ranks 36th in math. east asian countries top all three categories in science, the u.s. ranks 28th. only in reading are u.s. students really above average and still pretty much in the middle of the pack. shanghai takes every spot but they hardly represent all of china. it's a slim, slim look about the education system in china. the u.s. slipped in the rankings since 2009. scores are a little changed from the first report in 2000. what's wrong here? the report blames weak u.s. curriculum and education secretary arne duncan calls it a picture of educational stagnation. this is a reality at odds with aspirations to have the best educated work force in the world. he's pushing new common core standards in 45 states. a nationwide drive to standardize education hoping to stem the slide and reenergize american students. brooke? >> we roll on. i'm brooke baldwin here in new york with you today. news after an admission by the engineer at the controls of the speeding train tha
's covered by most health plans. >>> there's no question the world of education isn't what it used to be. ask anyone from teachers to parents, even students themselves. a new report by the american civil liberties union of pennsylvania looked at student discipline and whether the practice of zero tolerance is actually helping or hurting students and the verdict -- well, the overly broad policy just isn't working. and joining me to discuss is broward county public school superintendent robert brunsy, president of national school services committee and psychologist wendy walsh. >> tell us what zero tolerance is and why turn away from it now? >> well, the reason why we would turn away from it is because zero tolerance policies are not effective. in 2011 in broward county, we had the largest number of stude student school-related arrests in florida. 1,062. out of that 754 of them, about 75%, were for non-violent misdemeanor offenses. these are things that would normally have been handled by schools in the past and as we see the numbers continue to grow, they just put children on a trajectory that
: the education system, the job system is not treating all americans equally. you see that in the minority numbers. some of the callers have talked about this. anyou're going into environment where you are the orst person of this race gender in that role, how much more difficult is it for you to break in as opposed to a workforce that is more diverse? host: you look at the overall but the number%, approaches numeral seven percent because of the increase in african-american unemployed and teenagers. correct? guest: that is part of the factors. you have much higher unemployment among minorities and younger people. you also look at it based on educational breakdowns. the unemployment rate is considerably higher among those who have not completed high school compared to those who have completed college. work isic morath's available online. thank you for being with us. coming up next, the vice president is back in the u.s. following a weeklong trip that included stops in china, south korea, and japan. we will have david lampton joining us from johns hopkins to discuss the state of relations between the
the questions. sallie mae also is the biggest u.s. student lender. loans to student of on education from the 2012 program for international student assessment, an exam given to 15-year-old worldwide shows the 90 students lagging in math and just average in reading. american students fail to place in the top 20 in any category. education secretary arne duncan calls the result "picture of educational stagnation coastal but added we must invest in early education, raise academic standards, and do more to notchit and obtain top- educators. top scoring teams are in singapore, south korea, japan, and hong kong. an update on the new york city ormuter train derailment reporting investigators believe the operator of the train involved in the jarrell meant on sunday fell asleep prior to the incident. william rockefeller all but admitted he dozed off. sources say he was, in their words, jolted from a sleep and hit the break. but he did not have enough time to stop the train as they headed into a curve rated for only 30 miles an hour at a speed of greater than 82 miles per hour. four people were kil
to education. he could have stayed in his community, but he saw -- he started to see himself as an african, not just as a hoso, he started to see himself and see how the white regime was dividing people by stressing ethnic differences and he was able to overcome that. i think that's such an extraordinary thing. >> it's true. it's true. he was a courageous human being and full of the idea that he was on a journey, and he had something to do, he had a place to be, and it's fabulous to realize that there's an old spiritual, old gospel song which is i'm on my journey now, mount zion, on my journey now, mount zion, and i wouldn't take nothing, mount zion, from my journey. mount zion. he was on the journey and he knew it and he had something to do. and this is what each of us has, if we have enough courage, we can say i'm on a journey, i have a charge to keep. >> you were living in cairo with your husband, south african freedom fighter when you first met nelson mandela. i understand your husband and mandela were something of rivals, but that didn't matter to mandela. tell us about that experienc
. you went to where. >> never mind. >> oh, my god tell me all these educated people on the set what is he trying to say. >> i went to alabama so i can probably explain it better than anybody else. boy that cuts like a knife. >> tell me, what is the concept. >> we don't know how to kick a field goal when we're at the 15 yard line. >> great game. >> is anyone here? >> kicked the ball -- 59 yard kick but we don't kick a 15 yard field goal. anyway, so let me just say there were a lot of people -- i'm going to say two things so you can't jump on me after i say the first thing. okay. >> okay. >> number one i hate to be harold ford everybody told us back in 1996 when we tried to pass welfare reform and limit the number of weeks, months, years people could be on welfare that we were the most cold hearted hateful people of all time and young children would starve and grand mothers would be thrown out in the snow. we were. we were called the most heartless people of all time. we passed it over two bill clinton wes to. he signed at any time third time. most everybody said that it was a great s
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